Traineeships

Traineeships are designed for young people aged 16 to 24, who want a job or an apprenticeship ...

... but who aren't yet ready, so need to get some work experience first

A traineeship can last up to six months. Trainees spend at least six weeks on a work placement with an employer. The rest of the time is spent with a training provider learning other work and job hunting skills, and working on English and maths if a grade 4 or C in these subjects at GCSE wasn't achieved. Over half of trainees go on to do an apprenticeship.

Traineeships aren't paid but employers sometimes pay expenses for things like travel and meals. Depending on the circumstances, some young people may get a bursary and their families may continue to get child benefit and child tax credits or part of Universal Credit that is for the trainee. See the lists of local training at Entry Level 1 to Level 1 and 2.

 

Video

Traineeships

Liam talks about why a traineeship at FareShare in Leeds has worked for him.

Want to talk to someone?

Your C&K Careers school or college careers adviser can help and advise you – get in touch with the careers team in school.

Or ring 01484 225500 and ask for Infoline; email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; use our Infoline feedback form; Text: Info, followed by your message to 07786 202804

Get in touch with your nearest centre:

Page updated November 2017

Employment

Girl serving a customer in a cafeYoung people can usually work full or part-time but ...

... there are laws around when you can and can't work

You can be employed part-time while you are still at school but there are local by-laws for employing children and young people and national employment laws to protect you, such as a young person cannot work during school hours. Examples of part-time jobs for school age young people, include waiting on tables, shop work and paper rounds.

Legally you can start full-time work after the last Friday in June of year 11. Due to Raising of the Participation Age (RPA) young people entering employment should also continue learning as part of their employment, until they are 18.

Full-time employment for young people is usually an apprenticeship or job with training. If you are not ready for an apprenticeship you can look at other training, such as a traineeship. Young people over the age of eighteen can do a job without training but many employers will offer their employees some kind of training.

You have rights at work, including a right to a National Minimum Wage for employment as well as a minimum wage for apprenticeships. If you're in paid employment or in an apprenticeship you are classed as being in employment so child benefit and child tax credits will stop or Universal Credit may be reduced once you have started work or an apprenticeship.

Local Recruitline vacancies 220wx24h, including apprenticeship vacancies and jobs with training in Kirklees and Calderdale are advertised on both ckcareersonline and the National Apprenticeship Service pages on GOV.UK

Want to talk to someone?

Your C&K Careers school or college careers adviser can help and advise you – get in touch with the careers team in school.

Or ring 01484 225500 and ask for Infoline; email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; use our Infoline feedback form; Text: Info, followed by your message to 07786 202804

Get in touch with your nearest centre:

Page updated July 2017

Apprentice case studies

Read more about why Mary chose an apprenticeship below ...

Apprentices... or check out one of the other local apprentices' stories:

 
Bradley - Legal exec apprentice

Shannon
- Retail apprentice

Luke - IT apprentice

Imogen - Accountancy apprentice

Olivia
 - Accountancy apprentice

Abbie
 - Accountancy apprentice

Darren - Customer service apprentice


 

 







Mary

How did you hear about your apprenticeship?

Through Kirklees College

When did you realise that an apprenticeship is what you wanted to do?

When I was told it wasn’t all theory and was more hands on work.

Why not college?

Having to sit in a class room every day and learn the theory behind something is not the same as seeing it happen in real life. How often does something go to plan really? In college its all the time, there is never any just in case methods told. Whereas on the job things go wrong all the time… it’s life at the end of the day. Nothing is perfect.

Was it easy to get on your apprenticeship and what qualifications did you need?

My apprenticeship was not that difficult when you know where to look for jobs. They wanted 5 A-C GCSEs including maths, English language and IT. If not Level 2 Functional Skills was given.

What is it like working for your company?

I enjoy working for my company as you never truly know what the next day will bring. They always help me whenever I need it. A lot of them have been apprentices themselves, so they know how hard it is. Plus you meet some really nice Customers.

Did they give you training and if yes, what did the training involve? Did they give you enough support?

Yes, so far I have been given the Level 1 Pool Plant course and manual handling. Along with the inductions and tool box talks. They help you through everything and are not afraid to get involved when things need adjusting. For example, they are helping me do as much of my job as possible as I cannot do my Level 2 Pool Plant until I am 18 ... Can’t wait!

What would you say are the perks of the job, the fun parts?

I would say the perks of my job would defiantly be the full gym membership for £25 a year! The fact you learn something every day and it is never boring. All they want is for you to achieve, so they all help each other.

What are the people like to work with?

The customers can be really nice but they are nothing compared to most of the staff! It is one big happy family here. Especially in the energy/maintenance section that I’m in. We always have our jokes and banter. That is necessary in a healthy workplace. We have big awards ceremonies and Christmas dos like every other company but this is different. This is Family.

How often did you attend college and what is your course?

I attend College once a week and Study electrical and maintenance principles. Of course with organisation & efficiency and the obvious Health & safety.

Did you like your course? How helpful were your tutors?

I enjoy my course as much as anyone can enjoy two hours of health and safety. I Love the electrical side and learning how things work. The tutors are amazing and always out to help.

Do you think the balance between working and being at college was right?

Yes I believe there is just enough time in each to get the work done. You need more time at work to get the evidence to pass the college part.

How did doing an apprenticeship affect your social life?

It did wonders for my social life as my weekends are free for one. Plus I’m earning, so I can do more. Now if only my friends were the same it would be great.

Did it help to fund activities with your friends? Hobbies?

Now I go to the cinema and Lazer Zone at least once a month.

Did it help you to save money?

I have saved a lot of money since I have started my apprenticeship. Saving for the future now to make it easier.

Did it provide you with the funds to treat yourself?

Of Course! I go out for meals and buy myself treats like PS games and movies.

How did your apprenticeship help you personally?

Yes, My apprenticeship gave me the confidence to ask questions and be myself. It told me that just because I was a girl didn’t mean I couldn’t do whatever I want like the boys can. It encouraged me to strive for better in college and out.

How has your apprenticeship benefited you?

My Apprenticeship has given me friends, I’m healthier plus I have money! If I didn’t do an apprenticeship I could go to college, uni if I wanted to and still not get a job at the end. That is not the case here.

What was the outcome at the end of your apprenticeship?

Lets wait and see shall we, I’m hoping a pay rise and a job

What are your plans for the future?

To work with energy and electrics. These are my passions. Oh and a house and car would be nice too.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

Hopefully in university all paid for by KAL *fingers Crossed*

 

Page updated September 2016

Abbie case study

Read more about why Abbie chose an apprenticeship

Abbie PictureHow did you hear about your apprenticeship?

My employer told me about the apprenticeship that I would be taking part in.

When did you realise that an apprenticeship is what you wanted to do?

I attended all of my college induction days and didn’t like the college experience, it felt like just another high school setting. I realised I had out grown school and needed a new challenge.

Was it easy to get on your apprenticeship and what qualifications did you need?

To get on my apprenticeship course I only needed a C pass in English and maths, I had exceeded the requirements for my course and found it easy to get signed on.

What is it like working for your company?

I work for a company called Fusion Business Solutions Ltd, we do HR for over 100 schools across the country and multiple small businesses nationally. I’ve always enjoyed working for Fusion as I originally started at the company as a Saturday girl when I was 13. Everyone that works at Fusion is unique and are really passionate about the jobs. We have fun at Fusion, although the industry we work in is quite sensitive we are able to have a laugh and keep positive about work.

Did they give you training and if yes, what did the training involve? Did they give you enough support?

The team were really supportive in my training for work and my apprenticeship. I had an initial induction, which taught me the different procedures I would need to follow in order to complete my different responsibilities. Since then I have been lucky enough to go on-site to clients and get informal training of the different HR procedures that occur in schools.

What would you say are the perks of the job, the fun parts?

Everything is fun, even the [not so nice jobs] like emptying the bins, we make a game out of it.

What are the people like to work with?

I work with a great group of people; we all work really well together and can have a proper laugh. We regularly have a giddy 5-10 minutes when we’re going through a stressful period in order to try and relax a little. I’m quite lucky to work in an office full of woman and not have to deal with petty bickering and talking behind peoples back, which would normally be expected. We’re a team and a good group of friends that regularly go out together to concerts, meals out and the races.

How often did you attend college and what is your course?

I only attended college once for an ICT course. Other than that all my training was at work.

Did you like your course? How helpful were your tutors?

I’ve really enjoyed my apprenticeship year; I had a lovely assessor, Pat who works at Wakefield College. She was so helpful and would always give me as much time as I needed to go through my work with her.

How did doing an apprenticeship affect your social life?

My social life is a lot better than some of my friends as I am able to go out on nights and weekends without having to revise or do homework like a lot of friends. I definitely have more free time.

Did it help you to save money?

No, if anything I go out with my friends a lot more than I did at school and it always involves a shopping trip, a meal out or a drink. I was able to save money and bought my first car, insured it, taxed it and paid for all my driving lessons.

Did it provide you with the funds to treat yourself?

Yes! I’ve always been able to go out with my friends and family to enjoy a treat or two.

How did your apprenticeship help you personally?

I’ve definitely grounded myself a little and learnt to evaluate situations a bit better instead of being a typical teenager and blowing things out of proportion, which causes unnecessary drama. I was already a very confident and bubbly person but it has given me the confidence and skills to attend conferences and present my company.

How has your apprenticeship benefited you?

My apprenticeship has taught me loads of different skills to apply to my job that I wouldn’t have learnt through college. I’ve learnt how to stay calm in difficult situations, write documents to a professional standard and present to potential clients at conferences and presentations. I think my apprenticeship has taught me that you can’t do everything at 100mph and not burn yourself out. I’ve definitely learnt to manage my workload and priorities better which helps me give a better service to my clients.

What was the outcome at the end of your apprenticeship?

So far I have completed my Level 2 Diploma in Business and Administration. I am starting my Level 3.

What are your plans for the future?

I’d love to get up to an account manager level in the HR profession and have my MCiPD.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

In five years I hope to be working towards finishing my Level 7 CiPD qualification, which is the equivalent of a Masters Degree in HR.

Page updated August 2016

Bradley case study

Read more about why Bradley chose an apprenticeship

Bradley UntitledHow did you hear about your apprenticeship?

I embarked on my apprenticeship with Chadwick Lawrence and can safely say when I was offered the apprenticeship I had no idea the apprenticeship route I had just been offered even existed.

When did you realise that an apprenticeship is what you wanted to do?

I was always of the belief that the only route to becoming a lawyer was through university, but I couldn’t have been happier to be wrong. My apprenticeship role is an apprentice legal executive - a trainee lawyer in other words; they are basically the alternative to a solicitor.

Why not college?

I was in my final year at Greenhead College with my final set of exams pending when I was offered the apprenticeship. The offer steamed off the back of a successful work experience placement and a summer job at Chadwick Lawrence.

Was it easy to get on your apprenticeship and what qualifications did you need?

My apprenticeship was of course conditional; I had to gain three A-Levels at grade B or above, but as eager as I was to start, I started before I even got my results. I nevertheless did achieve the grades I needed and left with four A levels at grade B and above – I suppose the fact that my apprenticeship was conditional gave me the extra boost I needed to get the higher grades. I had applied to universities to read law and received offers from all of the universities I applied to, including Manchester and Leeds, but turned them all down on the day I signed the dotted line of my contract to officially begin my apprenticeship.
Although I have always been academically strong and been pushed towards university, since as far back as I can remember I have always wanted to be an apprentice.

What is it like working for your company?

My employer has so far provided a wealth of knowledge and experience to accompany my apprenticeship. I work under the direct supervision of an equity partner and member of the Chadwick Lawrence board – so two days are never the same. Working in the office is a good laugh and you cant ever go a day without a smile on your face.

Did they give you training and if yes, what did the training involve? Did they give you enough support?

I attend Leeds City College once a week on a Tuesday to study for my CILEX (Chartered Institute of Legal Executives) qualifications. I am currently in the process of obtaining my Level 3 qualification and looking forward to going on to and completing my Level 6 CILEX qualification to become a legal executive.

What would you say are the perks of the job, the fun parts?

My apprenticeship route has three main perks along with the general benefits of being an apprentice, such as earning while you learn and all the rest. These are:

  • The experience – I think you would have a tough time to find an apprenticeship or even a job at 18 where you are drafting documents, speaking to clients and sitting across the table from millionaires on day one.
  • The support – being under the direct supervision of an experienced mentor (in my case an equity partner) gives you access to a wealth of knowledge and experience that you cant find in any textbook or classroom.
  • Application – the ability to take what you learn in the classroom and to be able to apply it in the workplace the very next day.

How did doing an apprenticeship affect your social life?

I almost always have my weekends free to do as I please and during the week I usually have some sort of corporate or networking event to attend – most have free drinks!

Did it help you to save money?

I am much better off financially. I would have accumulated roughly (in fees alone) £50,000 worth of debt, and on the flip side of the coin I will earn that much money in the same amount of time being an apprentice, resulting in a £100,000 difference.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

I see myself being a fully qualified legal executive with an ambition to becoming an associate at the firm I currently work for ... Over the past 12 months there have been sweeping changes with regard to legal executives, and therefore implications on myself as an apprentice – all good.

Through an apprenticeship it now takes only five years (or even four if you really push for it) to become a qualified lawyer compared to six years (or seven in most cases due to low demand) for a solicitor. We have been granted higher rights of audience and now have the exact rights as solicitors do when it comes to going to court.

Legal executives now also can act independently from solicitors and to top it all off can now become judges in nearly every court apart from the high court and supreme court – the exact same as a solicitor.

Page updated August 2016

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